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Showing posts from August, 2009

A Zero Error Policy – Not Just for Backups

In What is a Zero Error Policy, Preston de Guise articulates the need for aggressive follow up and resolution on all backup related errors. It’s a great read.Having a zero error policy requires the following three rules:All errors shall be known. All errors shall be resolved. No error shall be allowed to continue to occur indefinitely. andI personally think that zero error policies are the only way that a backup system should be run. To be perfectly frank, anything less than a zero error policy is irresponsible in data protection.I agree. This is a great summary of an important philosophy. Don’t apply this just to backups though. It doesn’t matter what the system is, if you ignore the little warning signs, you’ll eventually end up with a major failure. In system administration, networks and databases, there is no such thing as a ‘transient’ or ‘routine’ error, and ignoring them will not make them go away. Instead, the minor alerts, errors and events will re-occur as critical events at…

Content vs. Style - modern document editing

On ars technica,  Jeremy Reimer writes great thoughts on how we use word processing.

His description of modern document editing:

Go into any office today and you'll find people using Word to write documents. Some people still print them out and file them in big metal cabinets to be lost forever, but again this is simply an old habit, like a phantom itch on a severed limb. Instead of printing them, most people will email them to their boss or another coworker, who is then expected to download the email attachment and edit the document, then return it to them in the same manner. At some point the document is considered "finished", at which point it gets dropped off on a network share somewhere and is then summarily forgotten... We use an application that was optimized to format printed documents in a world where printing is irrelevant, and our ‘document versioning’ is managed by the timestamps on the e-mail messages that we used to ‘collaborate’ on writing the document. Wh…