DNS RPZ - I like the idea

An opt-in real time black hole list for untrustworthy domain names?

Interesting.

Some thoughts:

I certainly don't think that offering the capability is a bad thing. Nobody is forced to use it.

Individual operators can decide what capability to enable and which blacklists to enable. ISP's could offer their customers resolvers with reputation filters and resolvers without.  ISP's can offer blacklisted/greylisted resolvers for their 'family safe' offerings. Corporations/enterprises can decide for themselves what they blacklist.

A reputation based white list would be interesting. Reputation could be determined by the registrar, perhaps based on the registrar having a valid, verified street address, phone and e-mail for the domain owner. A domain that has the above and has been registered for a month or so could be part of a white list. A domain that hasn't met the above could be gray listed. Operators could direct those to an internal 'caution' web page.

A downside:

Fast flux DNS based botnets are a significant issue, but I don't think that a black list of known-bad domains will solve the problem. If a malware domain is created as a part of a fast flux botnet, a black list will never be able to keep up. It could still be useful though. Some malware is hosted on static domains.

Optional:

A domain squatters blacklist. I'd love to be able to redirect address bar typos to an internal target rather than the confusing, misleading web pages that squatters use to misdirect users. I don't care if domain squatters business model is disrupted. They are speculators. They should expect to have their business models disrupted once in a while.

Are we creating more vulnerabilities than we are fixing?

Looking at ZDNet's Zero Day blog:

Sept 15th: Apple QuickTime flaws puts Windows users at risk
Sept 14th: Stuxnet attackers used 4 Windows zero-day exploits
Sept 13th: Adobe Flash Player zero-day under attack
Sept 10th: Primitive 'Here you have' e-mail worm spreading fast
Sept 9th: Patch Tuesday heads-up: 9 bulletins, 13 Windows vulnerabilities
Sept 9th: Security flaws haunt Cisco Wireless LAN Controller
Sept 9th: Apple patches FaceTime redirect security hole in iPhone
Sept 8th: New Adobe PDF zero-day under attack
Sept 8th: Mozilla patches DLL load hijacking vulnerability
Sept 8th: Apple plugs drive-by download flaws in Safari browser
Sept 2nd: Google Chrome celebrates 2nd birthday with security patches
Sept 2nd: Apple patches 13 iTunes security holes
Sept 1st: RealPlayer haunted by 'critical' security holes
Aug 24th: Critical security holes in Adobe Shockwave
Aug 24th: Apple patches 13 Mac OS X vulnerabilities
Aug 20th: Google pays $10,000 to fix 10 high-risk Chrome flaws
Aug 19th: Adobe ships critical PDF Reader patch
Aug 19th: HD Moore: Critical bug in 40 different Windows apps
Aug 13th: Critical Apple QuickTime flaw dings Windows OS
Aug 12th: Opera closes 'high severity' security hole
Aug 12th: Security flaws haunt NTLMv1-2 challenge-response protocolAug 11th: Adobe warns of critical Flash Player flaws
Aug 10th: Microsoft drops record 14 bulletins in largest-ever Patch Tuesday

I'm thinking there's a problem here.

Of course Zero Day only covers widely used software and operating systems - the tip of the iceberg.

Looking at Secunia's list for today, 09/15/2010:

Linux Kernel Privilege Escalation Vulnerabilities
e-press ONE Insecure Library Loading Vulnerability
MP3 Workstation PLS Parsing Buffer Overflow Vulnerability
IBM Lotus Sametime Connect Webcontainer Unspecified Vulnerability
Python asyncore Module "accept()" Denial of Service Vulnerability
AXIGEN Mail Server Two Vulnerabilities
3Com OfficeConnect Gigabit VPN Firewall Unspecified Cross-Site Scripting
Fedora update for webkitgtk
XSE Shopping Cart "id" and "type" Cross-Site Scripting Vulnerabilities
Linux Kernel Memory Leak Weaknesses
Slackware update for sudo
Slackware update for samba
Fedora update for samba
Red Hat update for samba
Red Hat update for samba3x
Google Chrome Multiple Vulnerabilities

Serious question:

Are we creating new vulnerabilities faster than we are fixing old ones?

I'd really like to know.

In some ways this looks like the early immature periods of other revolutionary industries.

We built cars. The early ones were modern wonders that revolutionized transportation and a wide swath of society. After a few decades we figured out that they also were pollution spewing modern wonder death traps. Auto manufactures sold their pollution spewing modern wonder death traps to customers who stood in line to buy them. Manufacturers claimed that there was nothing wrong with there products, that building clean autos with anything resembling safety was impossible, and that safe clean autos would cost so much that nobody could afford them. The customers were oblivious to the obvious. They piled their families into their death traps and drove them 85mph across South Dakota without seat belts (well - my dad did anyway - and he wasn't the fastest one out there, and I'm pretty sure I and my siblings weren't the only kids riding in the back of a station wagon with the tailgate window wide open...).

Some people described it as carnage. Others thought that autos were Unsafe at Any Speed.

Then came the safety & pollution lobbies. It took a few decades, a few hundreds million in lobbyists, lawyers and lawsuits, and many more billions in R&D, but we now have autos that are fast, economical, safe and clean.  A byproduct - completely unintended - was that autos became very low maintenance and very, very reliable. Maintenance windows went from hundreds of miles between shop visits to thousands of miles between shop visits (for oil changes) and tens of thousands of miles per shop visit (for everything but oil).

We need another Ralph Nader.  I don't want to wait a couple decades for the software industry to get its act together.

I'll be too old to enjoy it.

Thoughts on Application Logging

As a follow on to: 
I have a few semi-random thoughts on application logging.

Things I like to see in logs are:

ZFS and NFSv4 ACL’s

I've been doing granular file access control lists since Netware 2.0. I'm used to being able to specify (for example) permissions such that a file can be modified, but not renamed or deleted, or setting permissions on a file so that it can be executed, but not read - (Yes, Netware could do that). And of course, it's obvious that more than one user or group permission should be allowable. I'm also used to having some control over inheritance, so that I can 'kneecap' permissions on a nested directory.

Obviously I've been very unimpressed with Unix's trivial rwxr-x--- style permissions. Sun band-aided the decades old rwxr-x--- up with POSIX getfacl and setfacl. That was a start. We now have NFSv4 style ACL’s on ZFS. It looks like they are almost usable.