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Showing posts from September, 2010

DNS RPZ - I like the idea

An opt-in real time black hole list for untrustworthy domain names?

Interesting.

Some thoughts:

I certainly don't think that offering the capability is a bad thing. Nobody is forced to use it.

Individual operators can decide what capability to enable and which blacklists to enable. ISP's could offer their customers resolvers with reputation filters and resolvers without.  ISP's can offer blacklisted/greylisted resolvers for their 'family safe' offerings. Corporations/enterprises can decide for themselves what they blacklist.

A reputation based white list would be interesting. Reputation could be determined by the registrar, perhaps based on the registrar having a valid, verified street address, phone and e-mail for the domain owner. A domain that has the above and has been registered for a month or so could be part of a white list. A domain that hasn't met the above could be gray listed. Operators could direct those to an internal 'caution' web pa…

Are we creating more vulnerabilities than we are fixing?

Thoughts on Application Logging

As a follow on to:How to Do Application Logging Right by Anton Chuvakin and Gunnar PetersonApplication Security Logging by Colin Watson and the Common Event Expression (CEE) Architecture Overview [PDF],I have a few semi-random thoughts on application logging.Things I like to see in logs are:Machine parseable (yet human readable) format. I need to be able to write a regex that cleanly separates interesting messages and pipe them into sed/awk and extract critical fields from the messages. I typically use sed/awk/perl to strip out uninteresting parts of the message and sort/count pipe-to-Excel the rest of the fields. I also use logsurfer to catch real time events and alert interested parties. Even organizations with sophisticated tools still need to be able to parse the logs. Bonus points if all messages of a particular type have the same number of fields - or if variable word fields are at the end of the message. Single line events. No XML. I'm not going to write a custom multi-lin…

ZFS and NFSv4 ACL’s

I've been doing granular file access control lists since Netware 2.0. I'm used to being able to specify (for example) permissions such that a file can be modified, but not renamed or deleted, or setting permissions on a file so that it can be executed, but not read - (Yes, Netware could do that). And of course, it's obvious that more than one user or group permission should be allowable. I'm also used to having some control over inheritance, so that I can 'kneecap' permissions on a nested directory.Obviously I've been very unimpressed with Unix's trivial rwxr-x--- style permissions. Sun band-aided the decades old rwxr-x--- up with POSIX getfacl and setfacl. That was a start. We now have NFSv4 style ACL’s on ZFS. It looks like they are almost usable.For an experiment, I decided to clean up a few 'home directories' where the existing permissions are a mess of randomness left over from a decade of ufsdump/ufsrestore, POSIX ACL's, tar, cpio, pax…