Sunday, September 28, 2008

Essential Complexity versus Accidental Complexity

This axiom by Neal Ford[1] on the 97 Things wiki:

It’s the duty of the architect to solve the problems inherent in essential complexity without introducing accidental complexity.

should be etched on to the monitor of every designer/architect.

The reference is to software architecture, but the axiom really applies to designing and building systems in general. The concept expressed in the axiom is really a special case of ‘build the simplest system that solves the problem', and is related to the hypothesis I proposed in Availability, Complexity and the Person Factor[2]:

When person-resources are constrained, highest availability is achieved when the system is designed with the minimum complexity necessary to meet availability requirements.

Over the years I’ve seen systems that badly violate the essential complexity rule. They’ve tended to be systems that were evolved over time without ever really being designed, or systems where non-technical business units hired consultants, contractors or vendors to deliver ‘solutions’ to their problems in an unplanned, ad-hoc manner. Other systems are ones that I built (or evolved) over time, with only a vague thought as to what I was building.

The worst example that I’ve seen is a fairly simple application that essentially manages a lists of objects and equivalencies (i.e object ‘A’ is equivalent to object ‘B’) and allows various business units to set and modify the equivalencies. The application builds the lists of equivalencies, allows business units to update them and push them out to a web app. Because of the way that the ‘solutions’ were evolved over the years by the random vendors and consultants, just to run the application and data integration it requires COBOL/RDB on VMS; COBOL/Oracle/Java on Unix; SQL server/ASP/.NET on Windows; Access and Java on Windows; DCL scripts, shell scripts and DOS batch files. It’s a good week when that process works.

Other notable quotes from the axiom:

…vendors are the pushers of accidental complexity.

And

Developers are drawn to complexity like moths to flame, frequently with the same result.

The first quote relates directly to a proposal that we have in front of us now, for a product that will cost a couple hundred grand to purchase and implement, and likely will solve a problem that we need solved. The question on the table though, is ‘can the problem be solved without introducing a new multi-platform product, dedicated servers to run the product, and the associated person-effort to install, configure and manage the product?’

The second quote also applies to people who like deploying shiny new technology without a business driver or long term plan. One example I’m familiar with is a virtualization project that ended up violating essential complexity. I know of an organization that deployed a 20 VM, five node VMware ESX cluster complete with every VMware option and tool, including VMotion. The new (complex) environment replaced a small number of simple, non-redundant servers. The new system was introduced without an overall design, without an availability requirement and without analysis of security, cost, complexity or maintainability.

Availability decreased significantly, cost increased dramatically. The moth met the flame.

Perhaps we can generalize the statement:

Developers Geeks are drawn to complexity like moths to flame, frequently with the same result.

A more detailed look at essential complexity versus accidental complexity in the context of software development appears in The Art of Unix Programming[3].


  1. Neal Ford, “Simplify essential complexity; diminish accidental complexity [97 Things] ”, 97 Things, http://97-things.near-time.net/wiki/show/simplify-essential-complexity-diminish-accidental-complexity.
  2. Michael Janke, “Last In - First Out: Availability, Complexity and the Person-Factor,” http://blog.lastinfirstout.net/2008/03/availability-complexity-and-person.html.
  3. Eric Steven Raymond, The Art of Unix Programming (http://www.catb.org/esr/writings/taoup/html/graphics/taoup.pdf: Eric Steven Raymond, 2003), pp 339-343.

Sunday, September 21, 2008

Unplug Your Wall Warts and Save the Planet?

Do wall warts matter?
Photo051
(09/29-2008 - Updated to correct minor grammatical errors. )

Let's try something unique. I’ll use actual data to see if we can save the planet by unplugging wall transformers.

Step one – Measure wall wart power utilization.
Remember that Volts x Amps = Watts, and Watts are what we care about. Your power company charges you for kilowatt-hours. (One thousand watts for one hour is a kWh).

Photo048Start with one clamp-on AC ammeter, one line splitter with a 10x loop (the meter measures 10x actual current)and one wall wart (a standard Nokia charger for an N800).

And we have zero amps on the meter.

OK - That meter is made for measuring big things, so maybe I need a different meter.

 

 

Lesson one

Wall warts don't draw much current. They don't show up on the ammeters' scale even when amplified by a factor of 10.

Try again - this time with an in-line multimeter with a 300mA range.

Photo050
Children - don't try this at home - unless you are holding on to your kid brother and he is properly grounded to a water pipe.

(just kidding.....)

That's better. It looks like we have a couple milliamps current draw.

Try a few more. The ones I have (Motorola, Samsung, Nokia) are all pretty close to the same. Lets use a high estimate of 5mA @ 120v, or about a half of a watt.

Similarity, checking various other parasitic transformers, like notebook computer power bricks, yields currents in the low milliamp ranges. When converted to watts, the power draw for each brick is somewhere between one-half and two watts.

To make sure the numbers are rational and that I didn't make a major error somewhere, I did the simplest check of all. I placed my hand on the power bricks. When they are plugged into the wall and nothing is plugged into them, they are not warm. (Warm = watts).

One more sanity check. Plugging three notebook power supplies and three phone power supplies into a power strip shows about 30mA @ 120v for all six bricks, which is under 4 watts, or less than a watt each. My measurement are rough (I don't have a proper milliamp meter), but for estimates for a blog that nobody actually reads, they should be close enough.

So lets pretend that I want to save the planet, and that unplugging power bricks is the way I'm going to do it. I'll need to periodically plug them in to charge whatever they are supposed to charge. Lets assume they'll be plugged in for 4 hours per day and unplugged 20 hours per day. If I have a half dozen power bricks, I'll save around 5 watts x 20 hours = 100 watt-hours per day, or the amount of electricity that one bright light bulb uses in one hour. That would add up to 35kWh (Kilowatt-hours) per year. Not bad, right?

Until you put it into perspective.

Perspective
Let's take the other end of the home appliance spectrum. The clothes dryer (clothes tumbler to those on the damp side of the pond). That one is a bit harder to measure. The easiest way is to open up the circuit breaker box and locate the wires that go to the dryer.

Photo046
Hooking up to the fat red wire while the dryer is running shows a draw of about 24 amps @ 220 volts. I did a bit of poking around (Zzzztttt! Oucha!!.....Damn...!!!) and figured out that the dryer, when running on warm (verses hot or cold) uses about 20 amps for the heating element and about 4 amps for the motor. The motor runs continuously for about an hour per load. The heating element runs at about a 50% duty cycle for the hour that the dryer is running on medium heat.

Assume that we dry a handful of loads per week and that one load takes one hour. If the motor runs 4 hours/week and the heating element runs half the time, or two hours per week, we'll use about a dozen kWh per week, or about 600 kWh per year. That's about the same as 100 wall warts.

How about doing one less load of clothes in the dryer each week? You can still buy clothes lines at the hardware store - they are over in the corner by the rest of the End-of-Life merchandise, and each time that you don't use your clothes dryer, you'll save at least as much power as a wall wart will use for a whole year.

Lets do another quick check. Lets say that I have a small computer that I leave run 24 hours per day. Mine (an old SunBlade 150 that I use as a chat and file server) uses about 60 watts when powered up but not doing anything. That's about 1.4 kWh per day or about 500kWh per year, roughly the same as my clothes dryer example and roughly the same as 100 wall warts. Anyone with a gaming computer is probably using twice as much power. So how about swapping it out for a lower powered home server?

Notebooks, when idling with the screen off, seem to draw somewhere between 15 and 25 watts. (Or at least the three that I have here at home are in that range). That's about half of what a low end PC draws and about the same as 25 wall warts. So using a notebook as your home server will save you (and the planet) far more that a handful of wall warts. And better yet, the difference between a dimly lit notebook screen and a brightly lit one is about 5 watts. Yep - that's right, Dimming your screen saves more energy than unplugging a wall wart.

Make this easier!

How about a quick and dirty way of figuring out what to turn off without spending a whole Sunday with ammeters and spreadsheets? It's not hard.

If it is warm, it is using power.

The warmer it is, the more power it is using. (Your laptop is warm when it is running and cold when it is shut off, right?). And if you can grab onto it without getting a hot hand, like you can do with a wall wart, (and like you can't do with an incandescent light bulb) it isn't using enough electricity to bother with.

The CO2

So why do we care? Oh yeah - that global warming thing. Assuming that it's all about the CO2, we could throw a few more bits into the equation. Using the CO2 calculator at the National Energy Foundation in the UK and some random US Dept of Energy data, and converting wall warts to CO2 at a rate of 6kWh per wall wart per year and 1.5lbs of CO2 per kWh, it looks like you'll generate somewhere around 4kg of CO2 per year for each wall wart, +/- a kg or two, depending on how your electricity was generated.

Compare that to something interesting, like driving your car. According to the above NEF calculator and other sources, you'll use somewhere around a wal-wart-years worth of CO2 every few miles of driving. (NEF and Sightline show roughly 1kg of CO2 every two miles of driving). So on my vacation this summer I drove 6000 miles and probably used something like 3000kg of CO2. That's about 700 wall-wart-year equivalents (+/- a couple hundred wwy's).

Take a look at a picture. (Or rather....take a look at a cheezy Google chart with the axis labels in the wrong order....)
co2_
Can you see where the problem might be? (Hint - It's the long bright blue bar)
Obviously my numbers are nothing more than rough estimates. But they should be adequate to demonstrate that if you care about energy or CO2, wall warts are not the problem and unplugging them is not the solution.

Should you unplug your wall warts?


You can do way better than that!



Disclaimer: No wall warts were harmed in the making of this blog post. Total energy consumed during the making of the post: 5 - 23 watt CFL bulbs for 2 hours = 230 watt-hours; 5 - 25 watt incandescent bulbs for 1/2 hour = 62.5 watt-hours; one 18 watt notebook computer for 3 hours = 54 watt-hours; one 23 watt notebook for 3 hours = 69 watt-hours; Total of 415 watt-hours, or 28.8 wall-wart-days. Any relationship between numbers in this blog post and equivalent numbers in the real world is coincidental. See packaging for details.

The Path of Least Resistance Isn't

09/29-2008 - Updated to correct minor grammatical errors.

When taking a long term view of system management

The path of least resistance is rarely the path that results in the least amount of work.

As system managers, we are often faced with having to trade off short term tangible results against long term security, efficiency and stability. Unfortunately when we take the path of least resistance and minimize near term work effort, we often are left with systems that will require future work effort to avoid or recover from performance, security and stability problems. In general, when we short cut the short term, we are creating future work effort that ends up costing more time and money than we gained with the short term savings.

Examples of this are:
  • Opening up broad firewall rules rather than taking the time to get the correct, minimal firewall openings, thereby increasing the probability of future resource intensive security incidents.
  • Running the install wizard and calling it production, rather than taking time to configure the application or operating system to some kind of least bit, hardened, secured, structured configuration.
  • Deferring routine patching of operating systems, databases and applications, making future patching difficult and error prone and increasing the probability of future security incidents.
  • Rolling out new code without load and performance testing, assuring that future system managers and DBA's will spend endless hours battling performance and scalability issues.
Another way of thinking of this is that sometimes 'more work is less work'; meaning that often times doing more work up front reduces future work effort by more than the additional initial work effort. I learned this from a mechanic friend of mine. He often advised that doing what appeared to be more work often ended up being less work, because the initial work effort paid itself back at the end of the job. For example - on some vehicles, removing the entire engine and transmission to replace the clutch instead of replacing it while in the car is less work overall, even though it appears to be more work. With the engine and transmission in the car, the clutch replacement can be a long, tedious knuckle busting chore. With everything out of the car, it is pretty simple.

In the world of car collectors, a similar concept is called Deferred Maintenance. Old cars cost money to maintain. Some owners keep up with the maintenance, making the commitments and spending the money necessary to keep the vehicles well maintained. They 'pay as they go'. Other owners perform minimal maintenance, only fixing what is obviously broke, leaving critical preventative or proactive tasks undone. So which old car would you want to buy?

In the long run, the car owners who defer maintenance are not saving money, they are only deferring the expense of the maintenance until a future date. This may be significant, even to the point where the purchase price of the car is insignificant compared to the cost of bringing the maintenance up to date. And of course people who buy old collector cars know that the true cost of an old car is the cost of purchasing the car plus the cost of catching up on any deferred maintenance, so they discount the purchase price to compensate for the deferred maintenance.

In system and network administration, deferred maintenance takes the form of unhardened, unpatched systems; non-standard application installations, adhoc system management, missing or inaccurate documentation, etc. Those sort of shortcuts save time in the short run, but end up costing time in the future.

We often decide to short cut the short term work effort, and sometimes that's OK. But when we do, we need to make the decision with the understanding that whatever we saved today we will pay for in the future. Having had the unfortunate privilege of inheriting systems with person-years of deferred maintenance and the resulting stability and security issues, I can attest to the person-cost of doing it right the second time.